From the CEO Archives | PainChek

From the CEO

 PainChek® partners with the Melbourne Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) for Infant App PainFaces Study
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 PainChek® Signs UK Market Distribution Agreement with  Person Centred Software PainChek® has reached a key milestone in the international expansion of its PainChek® tool – the signing of binding distribution agreement with Person Centred Software.
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Designed to be used by parents, family and carers - anyone that cares for young children who are unable to verbalise their pain.
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The PainChek® Shared Care Program is a PainChek® licensing model which enables a professional carer, to extend their PainChek® license to a designated home-based family carer, so that they can continue to conduct pain assessments with PainChek® in between their clinical consultations.
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AI Technology Redefining Pain Assessment PainChek® provides carers across multiple clinical areas with three important new clinical benefits; 1.  The ability to identify the presence of pain, when pain isn’t obvious. 2.  To quantify the severity level of pain, when pain is obvious, and 3.  To monitor the impact of treatment to optimise overall care.
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PainChek CEO & Managing Director Philip Daffas, recently gave an update to Canary Networks on the company's recent milestones and future plans.        To read more from PainChek's CEO, click here....

We are the world's first smartphone pain assessment and monitoring device - automatically detecting pain through facial recognition, empowering caregivers to accurately assess and manage pain.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRryN8iHUQM...

The Dementia Support Australia (DSA) “PainChek® in Practice” pilot study from September 2017 to April 2018 confirmed improvement in behavioural problems of clients with dementia.  PainChek® has now been rolled out nationwide across DSA’s 150 consultants caring for up to 5,000 people with dementia per annum.  Findings of the pilot were presented in the international HammondCare Dementia Conference, Sydney during June 7th-8th in Sydney and are being submitted to a peer reviewed journal later this year.  The project initially commenced in two states, WA and SA in September and October 2017. DSA referred-clients (from residential and community aged care providers) with a behavioural problem(s) were followed over the course of service. From September 2017 to April 2018, 118 clients aged 57-98 years old with various types of dementias or cognitive impairments including Alzheimer’s dementia and vascular dementia were included in the project. Pain was one of the most common contributing factors (53%) to these clients’ behaviours. In those with pain identified as a contributing factor and with medical history provided, 27 (84.4%) out of 32 clients had at least one painful condition - most commonly arthritis. There was also a significant positive clinical association between pain and clients’ behaviours. When pain...

New study published in the Journal of Pain Research on PainChek® confirms its accuracy. PainChek® demonstrated excellent performance with high sensitivity (96.1%), high specificity (91.4%) and high clinical accuracy (95.0%). High scores for clinical usefulness of the new technology (95.0%) demonstrates its value in the clinical setting to clinicians and carers. A third peer reviewed study has been published in the Journal of Pain Research which supports the clinical usefulness of PainChek®. In order to attract widespread clinical use, it is important to confirm both the accuracy and usefulness of the technology compared to existing methods for assessing pain. Clinicians will naturally ask themselves “Does the new tool work and is it as good as what we already use?” PainChek Ltd CEO Philip Daffas said “These results, combined with previous studies, support the clinical usefulness of PainChek® and further confirms its accuracy in detecting and quantifying pain in non-verbal people, such as those with advanced dementia. The findings also provide clinicians with great confidence for wider uptake of the tool in clinical practice in Australia and internationally”. The new study confirmed the accuracy (measurements of correct classification) and usefulness (measures of clinical decision making) of the tool based on 400 paired pain...