Press Archives | PainChek

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St Andrews village in Hughes has been using PainChek for nine months and says it’s significantly improved its level of care and understanding. PainChek gives non-verbal patients, a voice. People that have cognitive impairment, dysphagia, Alzheimer's, dementia. and often, these people, unfortunately, cannot verbalise or communicate very well..
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A new tool is about to hit the market to help parents understand if their babies are in pain. Jeff Hughes, Chief Scientific Officer and Mustafa Atee, Research Scientist MPS, PhD, talk to Channel 9 in Perth.
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Better detection and management of pain has long been associated with high quality Aged Care1. Now the roll out of PainChek® (ASX:PCK) is allowing staff at residential Aged Care facilities to detect, measure and monitor pain through the facial analysis of a short 3 second video captured via their smartphone.
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More than 35 million people are living with dementia around the world, and more than 50% of these experience pain. This week, 23-27 July, marks National Pain Week in Australia.
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PainChek CEO & Managing Director Philip Daffas, recently gave an update to Canary Networks on the company's recent milestones and future plans.        To read more from PainChek's CEO, click here....

PainChek has been featured on Channel 9 (WA), as the app that holds the key to better health care for dementia sufferers who can’t speak. PainChek is currently being trialled in Perth with Swancare, as a high-tech way to ease patients’ suffering. READ the full article here >>    ...

SwanCare is engaging facial-recognition technology to assist seniors with dementia and who are experiencing pain but are unable to verbally express their discomfort.   SwanCare’s pilot of the PainChek® application is one of the first clinical application for the technology in Western Australia and will run across 15 residents in the dementia support wing at SwanCare’s Kingia Care facility, with a view to extend use in the home and palliative care. PainChek® is the first-of-its-kind automated facial recognition app - originally developed by Curtin University researchers - that detects facial micro-expressions indicative of pain. Previous research of the technology has shown that PainChek® offers a valid and reliable new method to assess pain in people with moderate to severe dementia.1,2It is anticipated that the technology will reduce behavioural disturbances caused by untreated pain, which are then inappropriately treated with sedatives and antipsychotic medications. Facial expressions associated with pain are the same across gender and ethnicity - from the more recognisable frowning and grimacing to micro-expressions such as tightening of the eyelids and wrinkling of the nose. The PainChek App operates on a mobile phone, using the camera to take a short video of the face to assess pain indicators with facial recognition and artificial intelligence software. These...

We are the world's first smartphone pain assessment and monitoring device - automatically detecting pain through facial recognition, empowering caregivers to accurately assess and manage pain.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRryN8iHUQM...

The national dementia advisory service is ramping up its engagement with doctors in a bid to reduce the use of psychotropic medications among aged care residents.   This article was published in Australian Ageing Agenda, written by Natasha Egan.   The national dementia advisory service is ramping up its engagement with doctors in a bid to reduce the use of psychotropic medications among aged care residents. The Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service (DBMAS) and the Severe Behaviour Response Teams (SBRT), which are operated nationally by Dementia Support Australia, provide personalised multidisciplinary support to people experiencing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. As previously reported, an analysis of SBRT cases for three months found the frequency and severity of severe behaviours were significantly reduced but only a slight decrease in psychotropic drug use. Associate Professor Stephen Macfarlane, who is head of clinical services at DSA, said the next challenge for DSA was to reduce inappropriate use of medications. “We had hoped that we would be able to demonstrate not only a massive decrease in behaviours but also a decrease in psychotropic drug prescription,” Associate Professor Macfarlane told Australian Ageing Agenda at the recent International Dementia Conference in Sydney. “We make recommendations around reducing psychotropics but only in about 10 per...

Providers are starting to reap the benefits of a game-changing pain assessment app, writes MARIA WHITMORE.   This article was published in the May - June 2018 edition of Dementia Technology.   Staff at Barossa Village Residential Services are using the PainChek app with 16 residents. The recent pilot of a pain assessment and monitoring device conducted as a partnership between Dementia Support Australia and the developer PainChek Limited has generated considerable interest among the aged care sector. Curtin University research fellow and app development team member Mustafa Atee says the collaboration between the publicly-listed company and DSA was critical to advancing its use in South Australia and Western Australia, where the pilot was conducted late last year. Since then, the PainChek app, which assesses pain in clients unable to communicate verbally, has been adopted by DSA, says Atee. The device is now in use in both states' DSA services, and will be rolled out across Australia to its 125 remaining consultants after its full integration into DSA's digital platform. The Class I medical device uses facial recognition software applied to a three-second video of a nonverbal client, combined with clinician input on their voice, movement, activity, behaviour and body, to assess the pain level in people such as...